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Education

NAM original coverage, youth media stories and ethnic media articles on education policy and its impact on immigrant and minority families. For more information on NAM education coverage, contact Carolyn Goossen at cgoossen [at] newamericamedia [dot] org.
Who Asked Us? Youth Column / School Matters Column / NAM 2008 Education Fellowship Report / Mosaic Monthly: Education News from the Ethnic Media / Key Contacts for California Reporters Covering Education / Recent Education Reports of Relevance to Reporters / Glossary of Education Terms

News > Education > 2 > 3 > 4 > 5 > 6 > 7 > 8 > 9

College Gender Gap Narrows . . . Except for Hispanics

Hispanic Business, News Report, Rob Kuznia, Jan 28, 2010

The perplexing college gender gap in which 57 percent of all U.S. undergraduates are women has, for the first time in years, failed to grow even wider, with one exception: Hispanic men continue to lose ground on Hispanic women, according to a new study

School Matters: California Must Raise Latino Student Achievement

New America Media, Commentary, Ted Lempert, Jan 22, 2010

The achievement gap hurts Latinos and is bad for California. With an economy increasingly reliant on an educated workforce, Californias inability to close the gap threatens the states future economic stability.

Living the Education Gap as a San Jose Teacher

New America Media, Commentary, Illiana Perez, Dec 26, 2009

As a first year teacher at a San Jose public school, I am witnessing the lifealtering impact of the education gap.

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A Young Mom Struggles to Find a Preschool for her Autistic Son

New America Media, Commentary, Janet L., Dec 17, 2009

A young mother struggles to find a preschool that meets both the needs of her autistic son and his non-autistic brother.

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Group Offers New Beginnings for Incarcerated Youth

New America Media, Jen Cooper, Dec 15, 2009

At a time when the juvenile justice system is being re-examined across the country, and programs in several states are found to be lacking for incarcerated youth, two women who met in law school in Washington, D.C. are pairing juvenile offenders with adults in the city.

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California Makes Gains in Teacher Quality, Study Finds

New America Media, News Report, Carolyn Ji Jong Goossen, Dec 15, 2009

The number of under-qualified teachers in California has diminished sharply, but students in the highest minority, highest poverty or lowest performing schools are five times more likely to have a teacher who is under-prepared.

Racial Tensions Between Black and Asian Students Boil in Philadelphia

Philadelphia Tribune, News Report, Robert Hightower, Dec 09, 2009

Racial tensions have come to a boiling point at South Philadelphia High School, where some Asian students are not showing up for class following an attack by African-American pupils

UC admission policy

New UC Admissions Policy Would Hurt African Americans, Asians

New America Media, News Analysis, Henry Der, Dec 08, 2009

A new admissions policy adopted by the UC Board of Regents earlier this year would dramatically reduce the number of African-American and Asian students admitted to most UC campuses starting next fall, and damage UC's commitment to diversity.

News > Education > 2 > 3 > 4 > 5 > 6 > 7 > 8 > 9






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