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First Chinese-Language Hepatitis B Advertisement Debuts

World Journal, Posted: Dec 10, 2008

NEW YORK Bristol-Myers Squibb pharmaceuticals said Sunday that it will broadcast a Chinese-language ad to encourage people to talk about hepatitis B with their doctors, the World Journal reports. It will be the first such non-English ad and is aimed at the Chinese because they have a higher risk of the disease compared to the general public. In the 60-second TV advertisement, two hepatitis B patients will speak about their personal experience and tell how to get more medical information about the disease. Statistics show that the rate of hepatitis B in the Chinese community is five to six times the rate among whites. Hepatitis B is also widespread among Koreans and Vietnamese, whose rates of infection are eight and 13 times that of whites, respectively Jeff Caballero, president of the Association of Asian Pacific Community Health Organizations, said the ad is necessary. "We found that the public receives information better when we communicate with them in their own language with consideration of their culture," he said. "Its especially true in the Asian community because people keep away from hepatitis patients, which makes the patients reluctant to seek help from a doctor.


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