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What to Expect From Immigration Reform, and When to Expect It

Posted: Jan 07, 2013

 As last week’s fiscal cliff deal left the debt ceiling and so-called sequestration disputes unresolved, pundits speculated that immigration might get pushed to the side. But congressional aides, lawmakers and advocates say the plans are on track and we should expect to see the first concrete steps sometime between President Obama’s inauguration on Jan. 20 and his State of the Union address a couple weeks later.

“The fiscal cliff has not done a whole lot to immigration reform. There’s a lot of reporting on that, but it’s still moving,” a Senate Democratic aide who spoke on condition of anonymity told me.

Work began on a bill following the elections among a bipartisan group of senators, dubbed the “gang of eight” by Politico, but which has now shrunk in size according to Washington insiders. The group is expected to take the first public step in the process by releasing a set of principles sometime after the inauguration. Full legislative language is not expected until March or April, according to the Senate aide and Beltway advocates, and a vote probably won’t come down until June at the earliest.

Both parties start the year in the red on immigration. Read more here.

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