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Latest Immigrants From Asia, Africa Better Off Than Early Immigrants

Sing Tao Daily, Posted: Apr 02, 2009

LOS ANGELES - A recent study by the U.S. Census Bureau shows that new immigrant families, with foreign-born parents and U.S.-born children, are more likely to live below the poverty line compared to older immigrant families who arrived a generation earlier. According to the Sing Tao Daily, about 21 percent of all new immigrant families are living in poverty, compared to 17 percent of families who were earlier immigrants. However, Asian and African immigrant families appear to be the exception to this statistic. About 12 percent of Asian and 19 percent of African new immigrant families are living in poverty.
The poverty rate for Asian and African early immigrant families is 15 percent and 37 percent, respectively. Mark Mather, author of the study, pointed out that parents education level, job and income are more
likely to be determining factors their children's future compared to families that have been living in the United States for several generations.



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