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A Bite of China: Food as Top Discussion in Chinese Blogosphere

Posted: May 23, 2012

 

A Bite of China has become the top topic for discussion in China's blogosphere in the last few days. It has attracted enthusiastic foodies to their televisions every night at 10:30pm. A 7-episode documentary series about Chinese culinary delicacies and since May 14, A Bite of China has been playing on China's state television broadcaster, China Central Television.

According to World Journal, more than 100 million Chinese residents are watching the show. The majority of Chinese audience sees this program as more than just the regular food show; they see it as a revolutionary program to reflect the value and quality of Chinese food and societal changes. Viewers also enjoy the series’ focus on the cooks and laborers who showed their tear and sweat by hunting, digging, and producing food products.


Sina reports that the show has encouraged viewers to speak out about their food safety concerns as the food safety crisis in China hasn’t been solved.

On the other hand, the documentary also stimulates Chinese audiences' consumption. Taobao, one of China's biggest online shopping sites, reports that the volume of search on food items that were introduced by the documentary has increased to 4 million times within one week , and sales have increased to 5.82 million, or 20%.

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