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Survey Documents Changing Faith of U.S. Latinos

Latino Print Network, Posted: Sep 02, 2009

A new survey by The Barna Group found that Latinos are assimilating the faith of the Caucasian population faster than predicted, essentially mirroring the faith of the nation's white population, reports the Latino Print Network. However, there were several key differences in religious beliefs: Latinos remain somewhat more likely to believe that a good person can earn his or her way into Heaven; and Latinos are twice as likely as the general population to be aligned with the Catholic church (44 percent vs. 22 percent, respectively). Compared to 15 years ago, Latino alignment with the Catholic church has dropped by 25 percentage points and identifying as a born again Christian is up by 17 percentage points. While many Latino immigrants come to the United States with ties to Catholicism, research shows that many of them eventually connect with a Protestant church. Second and third generation Hispanics are even more likely to depart from their Catholic tradition. The report was based on telephone interviews with 1,195 Hispanic adults conducted by The Barna Group between January 2007 and November 2008.


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