- 2012elections - 9/11 Special Coverage - aca - africanamericanalzheimers - aids - Alabama News Network - american - Awards & Expo - bees - bilingual - border - californiaeducation - Caribbean - cir - citizenship - climatechange - collgeinmiami - community - democrats - ecotourism - Elders - Election 2012 - elections2012 - escuelas - Ethnic Media in the News - Ethnicities - Events - Eye on Egypt - Fellowships - food - Foreclosures - Growing Up Poor in the Bay Area - Health Care Reform - healthyhungerfreekids - howtodie - humiliating - immigrants - Inside the Shadow Economy - kimjongun - Latin America - Law & Justice - Living - Media - memphismediaroundtable - Multimedia - NAM en Espaol - Politics & Governance - Religion - Richmond Pulse - Science & Technology - Sports - The Movement to Expand Health Care Access - Video - Voter Suppression - War & Conflict - 攔截盤查政策 - Top Stories - Immigration - Health - Economy - Education - Environment - Ethnic Media Headlines - International Affairs - NAM en Español - Occupy Protests - Youth Culture - Collaborative Reporting

Navajo Nation loses another Code Talker at age 90

Posted: Nov 01, 2012

 T he Navajo Nation has lost another Code Talker.

George Smith, 90, of Sundance, N.M., died Tuesday at Gallup Indian Medical Center in Gallup, according to a news release from the Office of President and Vice President.

Smith enlisted in the U.S. Marine Corps in 1943 and was trained as a code talker.

He achieved the rank of corporal while serving in the Pacific Theater during World War II and fought in the battles of Saipan, Tinian, and Ryukyu Islands and served in Hawaii, Japan and Okinawa.

He served as a Code Talker with his brother Albert Smith.

He was a member of the Navajo Code Talkers Association and the Church Rock Veterans Organization.

Smith was born June 15, 1922 in Mariano Lake, N.M. and attended school at Crownpoint and Fort Wingate, N.M.

He earned his diesel mechanic credentials in Chicago.

Read more here.

Page 1 of 1

-->




Advertisement


ADVERTISEMENT


Just Posted

NAM Coverage

Civil Liberties

Why There Are Words

Aug 10, 2011