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Civil Rights Leaders Push for Telecom Policy Reform

Posted: Dec 03, 2012


“Too few people or companies own too much,” said Rev. Jesse Jackson at the “Progressive Solutions in a Changing World” luncheon held during the Rainbow Push Coalition and Citizen Education Fund’s Annual Telecom Symposium. Jackson has been consistent over the years when discussing the state of broadcast media ownership and Federal Communications Commission (FCC) policies governing media ownership.

Titled “Back to the Future – Revisiting the Telecommunications Act of 1996,” the luncheon discussed such policies in the context of whether Congress should revise the Telecommunications Act to address the decreasing diversity in ownership in the media and telecommunications space, as well as the rapid growth of broadband Internet and its convergence on “silos” or specific sectors of the communications industry.

The luncheon came on the heels of a recent FCC report of commercial broadcast ownership, which demonstrates that minorities own what many consider a paltry number of the nation’s broadcast stations.

Read the rest here: MMTC


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