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U.S. Business Schools Emulate Indian American's Idea

Rediff.com, Posted: Sep 04, 2008

EVANSTON. Ill. -- Dipak C Jain was 17 minutes into his first presentation as the Dean of Kellogg School of Management when the world changed. This was 8.17 AM Chicago time, an hour behind New York. The date was September 11, 2001.

It would have been easy to wallow in this most inauspicious of beginnings. Instead, Jain, the first Indian to head a top-flight US business school, quickly got down to writing letters to the school's alumni seeking their help in placing the graduating students.

"I could see that the global economic environment would become tough and placing the students would be equally so. So I wrote to our former students many of who were in decision-making positions at small and medium enterprises that did not recruit from the top business schools," says Jain.

He was criticised for demeaning the Dean's position by "going around with a begging bowl". However, after Kellogg reported 91 per cent placement rate, the best among all B-schools in the country, in that troubled year, this went on to be become standard practice among the top B-schools.

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