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Court Ruling Affirms Tribal Sovereignty But Leave Door Open for Freedmen

Native Times, Posted: Aug 04, 2008

WASHINGTON, D.C. The U.S. Court of Appeals returned the case pitting the Cherokee Nation and descendants of former slaves known as freedmen to a district judge to determine if the freedmen could proceed with their battle for reinstatement as members of the tribe. Cherokee leaders hailed the decision for upholding tribal sovereignty. The freedmen, some 2,800 strong,have claimed that the Cherokee decision to strip freedmen of their citizen rights violated the tribe's 1866 treaty with the federal government. The freedmen are now convinced that under the appeals decision they will be able to proceed with their case against the tribe.

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