- 2012elections - 9/11 Special Coverage - aca - africanamericanalzheimers - aids - Alabama News Network - american - Awards & Expo - bees - bilingual - border - californiaeducation - Caribbean - cir - citizenship - climatechange - collgeinmiami - community - democrats - ecotourism - Elders - Election 2012 - elections2012 - escuelas - Ethnic Media in the News - Ethnicities - Events - Eye on Egypt - Fellowships - food - Foreclosures - Growing Up Poor in the Bay Area - Health Care Reform - healthyhungerfreekids - howtodie - humiliating - immigrants - Inside the Shadow Economy - kimjongun - Latin America - Law & Justice - Living - Media - memphismediaroundtable - Multimedia - NAM en Espaol - Politics & Governance - Religion - Richmond Pulse - Science & Technology - Sports - The Movement to Expand Health Care Access - Video - Voter Suppression - War & Conflict - 攔截盤查政策 - Top Stories - Immigration - Health - Economy - Education - Environment - Ethnic Media Headlines - International Affairs - NAM en Español - Occupy Protests - Youth Culture - Collaborative Reporting

U.S. Military Opens Eligibilty for Citizenship

Korea Daily, Posted: Dec 06, 2008



LOS ANGELES Facing severe shortages of doctors, nurses and interpreters in the military, the Department of Defense is to expand the number of foreigners it recruits, reports the Korea Daily. The U.S. government already attracts those living in the country on green cards, but under the new trial program, the military will recruit foreigners who've been living in the States on student and work visas. It will also include those with refugee or political asylum status and other temporary visas. The one-year pilot program aims to identify up to 1,000 foreigners who have lived in the States legally, for at least two years. The new recruits are also eligible for U.S. citizenship in return for military service in the United States or abroad, reported the newspaper. The military is 1,000 short of needed doctors and nurses, and wants those who speak Arabic, Albanian, Korean, Punjabi, Somali, Turkish, Burmese, Chinese, Czech, Malay and Swahili, among other languages.



Page 1 of 1

-->




Advertisement


ADVERTISEMENT


Just Posted

NAM Coverage

Civil Liberties

Why There Are Words

Aug 10, 2011