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A Latina in the Supreme Court?

La Opinin, News Analysis, Posted: Dec 30, 2008

LOS ANGELES Latino groups hope that President-elect Barack Obama will appoint the first Latino Supreme Court justice to the bench, reports La Opinin. Of the 110 judges that have served in the nations highest court, 108 have been white. The only two non-white judges have been African American: Thurgood Marshall, who served from 1962 to 1991, and Clarence Thomas, who has been a Supreme Court justice since 1991. With feminist groups calling for the president-elect to name a woman to the bench, some observers believe that a Latina could be a logical choice.

Some of the names being talked about are Sonia Sotomayor of the Federal Second Circuit Court of Appeals, a respected judge in the Bronx who is of Puerto Rican origin; and Kim Wardlaw of Californias Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals, who is Mexican on her mothers side. Observers say another possible choice could be Carlos Moreno of Californias Supreme Court in Los Angeles.

Only 7 percent of federal judges are Latino, although Latinos account for 15 percent of the U.S. population, La Opinin reports.

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