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Most New HIV Cases Affect Young Black Men and Teens

Posted: Nov 29, 2012


The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) reported in November that half of all new HIV infections in 2010 affected 12,200 young gay and bisexual teenagers and men. More than half the victims were African American, although young black people are more likely to get tested for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) than other at-risk groups, the study reported.

The study titled, "HIV Among Youth in the US: Protecting a Generation," appeared in Vital Signs, an online newsletter, published by the CDC, which is based in Atlanta.

Vital Signs reported that 26 percent of new HIV infections occurred among young people 13 to 24 years old. Four out of five HIV infections affect males.

In addition, Vital Signs found that 60 percent of new infections among young people affect African Americans, compared with 20 percent for Hispanics and 20 percent for whites.

The CDC also reported that 54 percent of new HIV infections occurred among African Americans who were either gay or bisexual.

The CDC found that 60 percent of young people did not know they were infected, so they did not receive treatment; therefore spreading the disease to others. Only 13 percent of high school students and 35 percent of people 18 to 24 years old have been tested, Vital Signs reported.

However, African-American young people are more likely to get tested for HIV than teenagers of other races and other ethnic groups.

About 50,000 people are affected by HIV each year, and young people 13 to 24 years old comprise 7 percent of the more than 1 million people living in the U.S. with HIV, the study found.


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