- 2012elections - 9/11 Special Coverage - aca - africanamericanalzheimers - aids - Alabama News Network - american - Awards & Expo - bees - bilingual - border - californiaeducation - Caribbean - cir - citizenship - climatechange - collgeinmiami - community - democrats - ecotourism - Elders - Election 2012 - elections2012 - escuelas - Ethnic Media in the News - Ethnicities - Events - Eye on Egypt - Fellowships - food - Foreclosures - Growing Up Poor in the Bay Area - Health Care Reform - healthyhungerfreekids - howtodie - humiliating - immigrants - Inside the Shadow Economy - kimjongun - Latin America - Law & Justice - Living - Media - memphismediaroundtable - Multimedia - NAM en Espaol - Politics & Governance - Religion - Richmond Pulse - Science & Technology - Sports - The Movement to Expand Health Care Access - Video - Voter Suppression - War & Conflict - 攔截盤查政策 - Top Stories - Immigration - Health - Economy - Education - Environment - Ethnic Media Headlines - International Affairs - NAM en Español - Occupy Protests - Youth Culture - Collaborative Reporting

South Koreans Soon to Benefit From Visa Waiver Program

Korea Times, news Report, Posted: Oct 16, 2008

South Korea and the United States Wednesday agreed to exchange information on suspected criminals, clearing the last hurdle to implementation of a visa waiver program that would allow their citizens visa-free visits to each other's country for up to 90 days, reports the Korea Times. South Korea wants the U.S. visa waiver by the year's end. According to the newspaper, the two governments concluded detailed discussions on providing criminal records of a limited number of suspects so immigration authorities of the two sides could access such information automatically at airports.

Currently, 27 nations, mostly developed countries in Europe, benefit from the Visa Waiver Program, but since the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, U.S. security measures tightened against possible terrorism. South Korean President Myung-bak and President Bush agreed in April to implement the VWP by the end of the year to help ease the long lines in front of the U.S. embassy in Seoul to get U.S. entry visas. U.S. also wants to expand the Korea-U.S. alliance beyond the security arena.

Page 1 of 1

-->




Advertisement


ADVERTISEMENT


Just Posted

NAM Coverage

Civil Liberties

Why There Are Words

Aug 10, 2011