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Tomorrow Has Arrived

Enlace, Posted: Nov 04, 2008

SAN DIEGO Today we march, tomorrow we vote has been the slogan of Latinos social struggle since millions of them discovered their collective strength during the 2006 immigrant rights marches. For many, this tomorrow has finally arrived, and according to polls it is likely that the country will elect its first African-American president. But perhaps more important, this tomorrow has been a long time coming for millions of African Americans, who almost 45 years ago marched through the streets demanding an end to barriers that prevented many of them from voting in some states, including taxes, literacy tests and other tactics.

This election is also historic for Latinos. The 2006 marches and national citizenship and voter registration campaigns created a new generation of Hispanic voters. Latino candidates will compete in 37 states today, a 42 percent increase over 1998. They will also have a prominent role in todays elections: The next president must win key states with high Hispanic populations, such as Nevada, New Mexico, Colorado and Florida.


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