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Filipinos and Boricuas, Closer than You Think

Primera Hora, Posted: Nov 14, 2009

GUAYNABO, Puerto Rico Tonights boxing match between Filipino Manny Pacquiao and Puerto Rican Miguel Cotto has generated excitement in Puerto Rico as fans cheer on their own fighter. But as the two boxing legends face off, Puerto Rican newspaper Primera Hora reminds its readers that there is more that unites the two cultures than divides them. From food to customs, climate to cultural heritage, the similarities are striking: Both have lived under the Spanish flag and the American flag. Both are archipelagos. English is taught in the schools in both places. Rice is an everyday food for Filipinos and Puerto Ricans. Other foods they share include: adobo, albndigas, chicharrn, dulce de leche, empanadas, escabeche, flan and longaniza, and bistec (steak) served with onions and rice. Both cultures are focused on family. Puerto Rico and the Philippines also share a tropical climate, complete with hurricanes. The majority of their populations is Christian, predominantly Catholic. Spanish names are also common in the Philippines. The 20 most common last names in the Philippines include: De los Santos, Del Rosario, De la Cruz, De los Reyes, Bautista, Reyes, Cruz, Garca, Torres, Ramos, Castro, Flores, Mercado and Castillo.


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