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Jesuit Massacre Still Haunts Salvadorans After 20 Years

New America Media, Commentary, Mary Jo McConahay Posted: Nov 16, 2009

Editors Note: Today marks the 20th anniversary of the murder of six Jesuit priests, their cook and her daughter - a turning point in El Salvadors civil war. Former NAM contributing editor Mary Jo McConahay, who has been a reporter for many years in Latin America, was the first reporter on the scene.

SAN SALVADOR -- Twenty years ago, three colleagues and I were the first reporters on the scene of the murders here of six Jesuit priests, their cook and her daughter, a turning point in the civil war that cost 75,000 other Salvadoran lives. As gatherings the world over commemorate the special anniversary, I remember details of that morning I do not want to forget.

Theyve killed Ellacuria, said the young priest in the hotel parking lot.

He had rushed over to tell reporters, he said, and we were the first he met.

We reserved belief. The death of Ignacio Ellacuria, rector of San Salvadors Jesuit university and a world-renowned theologian, had been announced more than once during the civil war. We jumped into a jeep anyway.

At the university side gate, we knocked on a black iron door. From across the street, a soldier in a guardhouse kept watch. Guerrillas of the Farabundo Mart National Liberation Front (FMLN) had been trying for six days to take over the capital. The army was fighting back with all the U.S.-supplied arms and aircraft it had. At this hour of morning, just after curfew lifted, you didnt know what lay behind any closed door.

Inside, on the grass, we saw four bundles covered with white sheets stained with what looked like blood.

Come with me, said Jos Mara Tojeira, the Jesuits Central America provincial. My colleagues, radio reporters, were already striding with their mics toward two clerics, one elderly and one very young, who stood gazing at the bundles. I followed Tojeira.

Come, look, he said as we stepped inside the residence.

A man lay lifeless in the hall. A priest, I supposed, but not Ellacuria. A smear of crimson streaked the floor. Tojeira stood by an open door to one of the rooms. He didnt speak, but tilted his head for me to look inside. A narrow room with a small bed and books, one fallen on the floor, next to a mans body, some blood. Not like knife wounds, likely bullets. I wrote in my reporters notebook furiously, sloppily, tethering myself to the pages. Each time, Tojeira waited.

Now we will go, he said.

Instead of returning to the garden, however, we descended a short flight of outdoor steps. A door stood ajar. I asked myself what more might be possible.

The body of a woman lay over that of a girl. The womans remains faced the door, as if she had stood in front of the girl at the last moment. I could hardly breathe. My own daughter was three at the time.

By the time Tojeira and I ascended to the garden once more, news photographers had arrived.

Father, you have to take the covers off the bodies, I said.

Tojeira looked alarmed for a moment, then decisive.

Promise me that these pictures, all this, will reach the Jesuits, will be known, he said.

I felt a jolt. Tojeiras words told me he was uncertain whether he would live through the day. Jesuits, most notably Ellacuria, had had the ear of both sides in the civil war, from President Alfredo Cristiani of the right-wing ARENA party, to leftist FMLN commanders. The scholar-priests pushed for a negotiated, non-military solution. To radical rightists, this was intolerable. A call for Death to Jesuits had surfaced, along with threats to others in the atmosphere of war.

I knew the photographers. I promised Tojeira. The sheets came off.

There was Ellacuria, still in his bathrobe, looking up, as if he had faced his killer. There was Ignacio Martin-Baro, the psychologist I had first met in San Francisco years before, when he explained to me how difficult it was to treat traumatic stress while people were drowning in war. Segundo Montes lay there, the sociologist to whom we always went for facts about the exodus that was making Los Angeles the second largest El Salvadoran city. He had tracked the uprooting carefully, sadly, holding back anger - it seemed to me - when he had described how the war was separating families, and emptied old towns.

I did not know the other priests who died that day, Amando Lpez, Joaqun Lpez y Lpez and Juan Ramn Moreno. I did not know (but felt I did) the cook and her daughter, Julia Elba Ramos and Celina Ramos. When I visited the place of the murders recently, I saw that the roses Julias husband planted in the days after the massacre had grown to dominate the garden. Ellacurias brown bathrobe hung behind glass in the nearby museum.

An engineering student named Martin sat in the little room I had last seen disheveled and smelling of death, with the bodies of the two women on the floor. Young Martin was describing to visitors the history of that day, allowing them to choose which of two photo albums they wanted to see, one that was more difficult to pore through, and one that was softer. How in Gods name, I wondered, might there be a soft version of the images I saw?

I did not feel like speaking, but carried away something I heard Martin say. He was only a toddler on that day 20 years ago, but as he learned how the men worked to end the war, minister among the suffering, and how they died, he decided to join others volunteering for the museum.

We cannot allow forgetting, he said.

Journalist Mary Jo McConahays Maya Roads, Travels through Space and Time in the American Rainforest, will appear in 2011, from Chicago Review Press.


Related Articles:

On Anniversary of El Salvador Jesuits' Slaying, Momentum for Justice

Salvadoran President Deploys Troops to Fight Crime

El Salvador's President-Elect Seeks Close Ties to U.S.

Deporting the American Dream



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