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Whos to Blame for Mexicos Narcoviolence

Univision Online, Posted: Jun 05, 2008

MIAMI -- Mexico is beginning to look like a war zone, Univision anchor Maria Elena Salinas writes in her syndicated column, and the drug cartels are better equipped than the government. Salinas argues that the problem is systemic: Mexican drug traffickers did not become powerful overnight. Its been decades in the making. Organized crime has infiltrated law enforcement and governmental agencies; former police and federal agents are now the hired killers of drug cartels; and politicians have been paid to turn a blind eye.

A recent editorial in the Mexican newspaper El Universal urged action against the drug traffickers and the corruption that protects criminal organizations, including the financial networks in charge of money laundering.

The newspaper also attributes part of the blame to the U.S. government. "Ninety percent of the weapons sent to Mexican drug traffickers come from the United States and enter through Nogales, El Paso and Yuma, but they are invisible to U.S. authorities who are busy persecuting the undocumented, the newspaper noted.

But Salinas argues that Mexico wont win the war on drugs until Mexicans decide to take back the institutions that gradually have been taken over by drug traffickers.


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