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U.S., Vietnam Study Climate Change

Nguoi Viet , news report, Posted: Nov 29, 2008

The United States and Vietnam will jointly address the impact of climate change on the Mekong Delta and other low-lying river regions worldwide, officials said. Scientists from both countries will work at a new Delta Research and Global Observation Network (DRAGON) institute, the first of several that are due to be set up worldwide, at southern Vietnams Can Tho University. Vietnam is among the countries most vulnerable to climate change, said Tran Thuc, head of the Vietnam Institute of Meteorology, Hydrology and Environment. ''If the sea level rises by about one meter, the whole Mekong Delta will be submerged,'' he said. The densely-populated Mekong Delta, a region of canals and waterways south of Si Gn, is Việt Nams main rice-growing region and produces more than half the countrys fish and seafood exports. The U.S.-led project hopes to include data in the future from 10 countries to gather information on deltas including those of the Nile, Yangtze and Volga rivers, said Gregory Smith, head of the National Wetlands Research Center of the U.S. Interior Department.



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