- 2012elections - 9/11 Special Coverage - aca - africanamericanalzheimers - aids - Alabama News Network - american - Awards & Expo - bees - bilingual - border - californiaeducation - Caribbean - cir - citizenship - climatechange - collgeinmiami - community - democrats - ecotourism - Elders - Election 2012 - elections2012 - escuelas - Ethnic Media in the News - Ethnicities - Events - Eye on Egypt - Fellowships - food - Foreclosures - Growing Up Poor in the Bay Area - Health Care Reform - healthyhungerfreekids - howtodie - humiliating - immigrants - Inside the Shadow Economy - kimjongun - Latin America - Law & Justice - Living - Media - memphismediaroundtable - Multimedia - NAM en Espaol - Politics & Governance - Religion - Richmond Pulse - Science & Technology - Sports - The Movement to Expand Health Care Access - Video - Voter Suppression - War & Conflict - 攔截盤查政策 - Top Stories - Immigration - Health - Economy - Education - Environment - Ethnic Media Headlines - International Affairs - NAM en Español - Occupy Protests - Youth Culture - Collaborative Reporting

More Families Turn to Cremation During Recession

La Opinin, Posted: Jan 05, 2010

LOS ANGELES -- A record number of cremations was conducted last year by the Los Angeles Coroner's Office, La Opinin reports. The shift is the result of the economic crisis, which has left many families unable to afford the cost of burial for their loved ones. Between Jan.1 and Dec. 30, 2009, the Coroner's Office conducted 724 cremations, up from the 708 in 2008 and 655 in 2007.

"We have more every year," Lt.David Smith told La Opinin. "One of the main reasons is that they [the families] have no money." Families that cant afford the costs of cremation may apply for the county government to dispose of the remains. The ashes are kept for three years before being buried in a common grave.

Page 1 of 1

-->




Advertisement


ADVERTISEMENT


Just Posted

NAM Coverage

Civil Liberties

Why There Are Words

Aug 10, 2011