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Forty-four percent of Korean-American Ivy Leaguers Drop Out

Korea Daily, Posted: Oct 05, 2008

LOS ANGELES -- Almost 1 out of 2 Korean-American students attending America's top universities drop out, defying the stereotype that they are all high achievers, reports the Korea Daily. According to the report, based on the findings from a Korean American's doctoral dissertation, the dropout rate of the students is over 44 percent, higher than that of Chinese-Americans (25 percent) and Indian-American (21 percent) students attending the same schools. The average dropout rate for all students is about 34 percent, reports the Korea Daily. The data is contained in Samuel S. Kim's doctoral dissertation "First and Second Generation Conflict in Education of the Asian American Community," presented at Columbia University last week, reports the Korea Daily. Kim tracked 1,400 Korean students registered at 14 universities -- Harvard, Princeton, Yale, Stanford, Cornell, Columbia, UC Berkeley, UC Davis, Amherst College, Duke, Georgetown, Brown, Dartmouth, and the University of Pennsylvania - between 1985 and 2007. Such a high dropout rate, Kim told the newspaper, is largely attributable to Korean parents pressuring their children to focus on the improvement of academic performance. He said that the parental zeal on education often prohibits the children from developing adaptability skills.

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