Monthly Mosaic: Education News from the Ethnic Media

Mosaic Monthly: January Issue

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Mosaic Monthly - Education News from the Ethnic Media

Mosaic Monthly returns to a new year of ethnic news. We encourage readers to share Mosaic with their associates. We welcome your comments at idea@ucla.edu.

-Mosaic Monthly editors

JANUARY 2007 EDITION

HEADLINES:

ACLU closely monitoring district?s response to complaints of lack of heat in classrooms, broken windows
The Compton Bulletin

Center of gravity shifts West and South
New America Media

Get up, stand up, Supreme Court, and don?t give up the diversity in education fight
BlackAmericaWeb.com

Achievement gap between White and Black students seems to be widening even as scores rise
Black Press USA

Disparities in academic achievement
La Opinion

U.S. textbook angers Korean American parents
The Korea Daily and Chosun Daily

Day schools seek solutions to leadership crisis
The Jewish Daily Forward

Young Chinese students face life alone in America
World Journal

Petition drive aims to force breakup of Crenshaw High
Wave Newspapers

Vietnamese American students help Vietnamese children in Vietnam for a chance to have an education
Nguoi Viet

Boomerangers return to Valley
Nguoi Viet

First generation Korean American named as new UC Merced chancellor
The Korea Times

 

 

 



School district again in question over broken windows, lack of heat
ACLU closely monitoring district’s response to complaints of lack of heat in classrooms, broken windows
By Allison Jean Eaton/The Compton Bulletin
January 31, 2007
Text in English

Compton High School is again being scrutinized after two parents filed a formal complaint regarding what they label as “deplorable” conditions at a high school. Parents Lourdes Rocha and Evelyn McIntosh, filed a complaint after contacting the ACLU of Southern California for assistance. The complaint cites the civil rights case Williams v. California, which holds school districts accountable for the quality of learning conditions for low- and moderate-income students of color statewide. The 2004 settlement effectively raised the standards for the basic conditions students need to learn, including textbooks, well-trained teachers and clean and safe school facilities.

Center of gravity shifts West and South
By Sandy Close/New America Media
December 2, 2006
Text in English

The Civil Rights Project, long housed at Harvard, is moving to the University of California at Los Angeles. For half a century, academic and policy perspectives on race relations have been largely shaped on the East Coast and through the prism of the Kerner Commission's landmark report "Two Nations: Black and White." The Project, in several bold moves, has embraced many of the new realities of race relations in 21st century America. With UCLA as its new home, the Civil Rights Project is renamed, Civil Rights Project/El Proyecto de CRP. The Project?s new co-director, Patricia Gándara, is a noted scholar on Hispanic affairs. Together with veteran director Gary Orfield, Gándara sharpens the Civil Rights Project?s focus on issues of concern to people of Hispanic heritage and on the nation?s largest concentration of indigenous peoples.

Get up, stand up, Supreme Court, and don?t give up the diversity in education fight
By Judge Greg Mathis/BlackAmericaWeb.com
January 5, 2007
Text in English

As the Supreme Court sets to consider two cases that seek to challenge the spirit of the Brown v. Board of Education decision to desegregate schools, Judge Mathis challenges the Court to use the supremacy clause of the U.S. Constitution to ground its decision on the goals of equal education and diversity. He calls to preserve affirmative action in education and to pursue equal education and diversity.

Achievement gap between White and Black students seems to be widening even as scores rise
By Marc Morial/Black Press USA
December 7, 2006
Text in English

Despite President Bush?s declaration that No Child Left Behind had good results and that the achievement gap is closing, others are declaring the gap is showing very few signs of closing and poor and minority students are not making significant gains in most states. In particular, the difference in percentage of White and African-American students performing adequately in math and reading appears to be expanding, instead of closing. While much depends on the interpretation of statistics, even with much optimism, the numbers paint a gloomy situation. On the positive end, quantifying the gaps has been an important step. What?s needed next is to press forward as civil rights activists did in the 60s to ensure our children will be able to compete in a global economy.

Disparities in academic achievement
By Ruben Moreno/La Opinion
January 4, 2007
Text in Spanish

A student’s opportunity for future success varies considerably depending on the environment in which he/she develops and grows, according to a study by the Editorial Projects in Education Research Center. The study concluded that factors such as a parent’s access to a living wage or post secondary education generally resulted in increased achievement; on the other hand, not speaking English or having a low income had the most negative impact. Students living in regions of the US that have high levels of linguistic integration have higher achievement than students in the South and along the Mexican border. According to State Superintendent of Public Instruction Jack O’ Connell, schools must offer rigorous academic content for all students. Additionally, government, business, and communities need to collaborate.

U.S. textbook angers Korean American parents
By Staff Writer/The Korea Daily and Chosun Daily
January 18, 2007
Text in Korean

LOS ANGELES - Korean American parents are angry about a controversial new novel in middle school curriculum, which depicts the plight of a young Japanese girl and her family from war-torn Korea, according to a report the Chosun Daily and the Korea Daily in Los Angeles. Parents are protesting “So Far From the Bamboo Grove” by Yoko Kawashima Watkins because they say the book is inaccurate and distorts Korea’s colonial past. The novel, based on the author’s experiences, tells of the flight of Japanese families from Korea after World War II and the many atrocities they suffered at the hands of Koreans. Korean American parents in Los Angeles, New York and Boston argue their children are being forced to read a novel they say portrays a false image of Koreans. They say the novel neglects to mention the years of abuse Koreans suffered under Japanese rule, and details of the author’s depiction of her escape are historically inaccurate. The Korean Consulate in the United States is pressuring the school board to remove the book from its reading lists.

Day schools seek solutions to leadership crisis
By Dan Levin/The Jewish Daily Forward
January 19, 2007
Text in English

NEW YORK - With Jewish school enrollment up 11 percent in the last five years, there is a shortage of qualified heads of school, reports Dan Levin in the Jewish Daily Forward. Eighty-three new schools have opened with too few qualified leaders. Jewish educators cite two reasons for the problem. First, there are, generally, too few qualified leaders in Jewish or general education. Second, leaders of Jewish schools have the tough job of dealing with boards, running the schools and raising money. Jewish educators meeting last November at the Jewish Theological Seminary recommended instituting for all day schools standard contracts with uniform benefits. They want to improve pay, establish training boards to work with heads, and reach out to university students to inform them of the attractions of becoming heads of school. There are also plans to make the culture of day schools more attractive by providing more support for administrators.

Young Chinese students face life alone in America
By Chen Qing/ World Journal
February 1, 2007
Text in Chinese

LOS ANGELES - As U.S. student visa policies relaxed, more Chinese students are coming to the United States to go to school without the care of their parents. These young people's struggle to adapt to life in America concerns the Chinese community, reports the Chinese-language World Journal. Many Chinese parents see sending their children to the United States as the best gift they can give their children. But the separation from their children can cause many emotional issues. Jeff Li, a young man from China, came to the United States when he was a sophomore in high school. Li's parents had saved all their money to send him to America. Once he arrived, Li had to quickly learn how to cook, manage finances, and take care of himself. Hai Yang, a young woman who also came to the United States to attend high school, said that many young people in her situation have difficulties communicating with their parents. These young people urge parents to think twice before sending their children abroad.

Petition drive aims to force breakup of Crenshaw High
Parents Union wants school district to follow model of several charter campuses that have sprung up in South L.A. and surrounding communities

By Gene C. Johnson Jr./Wave Newspapers
January 4, 2007
Text in English

SOUTH LOS ANGELES - Backed by seed money from Green Dot Schools founder Steve Barr, a group of Los Angeles parents are behind a petition drive to break up Crenshaw and Dorsey high schools into several smaller mini-campuses. Barr, who last summer opened several small charter schools in the orbit of troubled Jefferson High School, donated money to members of the non-profit Los Angeles Parents Union.

Vietnamese American students help Vietnamese children in Vietnam for a chance to have an education
By Tara Bui/Nguoi Viet
January 18, 2007
Text in English

Nearly 250 people attended an event staged by the United North American Vietnamese Student Associations, and learned about 82 needy families that cannot provide for their children’s future. In Rach Gia, Vietnam, kids scrounge around landfills. To provide scholarships and offer micro-loans for the struggling adults, UNAVSA members asked the audience for generous donations to raise $30,000, that the Catalyst Foundation will distribute to give Vietnamese boys and girls a chance at education. UNAVSA, an umbrella group for Vietnamese student associations sprouting on college campuses, launches a national Collective Philanthropy Project each year. For 2007, it selected Catalyst. For 2006, it highlighted the Vietnamese Alliance to Combat Trafficking, or VietACT, by amassing $40,000 for the grassroots venture dedicated to combating human trafficking.

Boomerangers return to Valley
By Carolyn Goossen/Nguoi Viet
December 29, 2006
Text in Vietnamese

Tate Hill grew up in the predominantly black, low-income neighborhood of West Fresno. A few years after leaving the Central Valley for college, he returned. Now he is vice president of programs and services for the Fresno West Coalition for Economic Development, not far from his old neighborhood. Mai Der Vang, 25, is another Fresno boomeranger, who says that "going away to college helped me to come back." At UC Berkeley, Vang loved new experiences and opportunities. "But somewhere inside, I knew it was not home," she says. Still, in the Central Valley and Fresno region, many other young people leave, never to return. This has led to a growing effort in the region to bring quality education and opportunity to the Valley, so that young people don't feel they must leave home to pursue their dreams.

First generation Korean American named as new UC Merced chancellor
By Staff Writer/The Korea Times
January 19, 2007
Text in Korean

SAN FRANCISCO - Steve (Sung Mo) Kang, 61, has been selected to be the new UC Merced chancellor by UC President Robert C. Dynes and the UC Board of Regents, reports the Korean language Korea Times. Kang is the first Korean chancellor of a major university in the US, and only the second Asian. Kang currently serves as dean of engineering at UC Santa Cruz. An internationally recognized engineer, Kang immigrated to the U.S. while he was in his senior year studying engineering at Yonsei Univerity in Korea. He received his bachelor's degree from Fairleigh Dickinson University, his master's from the State University of New York at Buffalo, and his doctorate from UC Berkeley. Kang holds 14 patents, has published more than 150 technical papers and has co-authored eight books. He is expected to assume his new position on March 1, 2007.

Mosaic Monthly is produced by UCLA’s Institute for Democracy, Education and Access (IDEA) and New America Media (NAM). Mosaic Monthly is a summary of education news from various ethnic media outlets representing, among others, African-American, Asian, Jewish, Latino, Middle-Eastern, and Native American communities. These summaries offer a glimpse of education issues as they are covered by some of California’s best ethnic media reporters. Please note we will provide these summaries on the fifth day of each month. The coverage includes articles from the previous month. We include a summary of each article in English. The full text of the article in the original publication is accessible by clicking the headline. In some cases the original text will be in another language. For more information about the Mosaic Monthly, or to subscribe or unsubscribe, please e-mail idea@ucla.edu.





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